Autism: we didn’t choose to be who we are


That’s right! If we had our way, we’d surely chose to be born handsome, beautiful or rich. We’d also chose to be normal.

Hang on there – normal? What’s normal anyway?

Autistic children experience the world differently from the way most other children do. They find it difficult to express themselves and talk to other people using words. Most of the time – they keep to themselves and can’t communicate without special help.

Normal sounds may also bother the austistic child, and even a mere touch may make them feel uncomfortable.

In our ‘normal’ world – we look at these children with sympathy. Some even go as far as to label them physically or mentally challenged. How I deplore these terminologies.

They are not, I repeat – ARE NOT mentally or physically challenged. We are born as a result of our karma. But it’s not my intention to dwell on Buddhist theories here.

All children are born special. And all are born precious. Some opine that autistic children are the result of dysfunctional genes. Others, especially the superstitious believe in the hocus pocus. Whatever theory they may form it doesn’t matter. Really.

What really matters is what are you going to do about it. Period.

The interesting fact is this revelation I got from a learned monk and after hours of scouring the Internet:Wikipedia postulates that autistic children are claimed to possess special, unusual and/or supernatural traits or abilities. The New Age concept developed by Nancy Ann Tappe in the 70s suggests that these autistic children are simply the next stage in human evolution, possessing paranormal abilities. They are more empathic, more creative and have a role to play in our world, our time.

Enter the 2012 prophecy. These children are thought to be instrumental in leading us into the New Age, after the so-called ‘end of the world’.

These are just theories and again, without substance.

What we must do is to emphatize with these children. To reach out and give a helping hand. It doesn’t cost much really. Think of how much we have wasted on ourselves. In our homes. Our cars. Now think just how much we need to do just to bring a smile to the faces of these special children.

My hometown is Segamat in the state of Johor. We experienced the worst flood in late January. Houses and roads were submerged under water. Economic losses were substantial. But these ‘normal’ people have the resources to build back what they have lost.

Not the autistic children.

The NASOM or National Autism Association of Malaysia in Segamat’s centre was literally wiped out. Everything has been damaged by the floods. Associations like these depend very much on charity. These children need beds, food, warmth, care and most of all – education. Readers who want to know more about NASOM can visit www.nasom.com.my.

If you can help, no matter how mig or small your contribution is – in cash or kind – that small gesture can make a big difference to these special children.

They didn’t choose to be born this way. But we can choose to make a difference to their lives.

 

If you are interested to know about indigo children, and are they here to save the world, do read http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/12/fashion/thursdaystyles/12INDIGO.html?ei=5088&en=277fb750ad762ed9&ex=1294722000&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&pagewanted=all

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s